Four decades old, and poised for the future.

The Forest Practices Act wound its way through the Oregon Legislature in the winter and spring of 1971. Known as House Bill 1624, it passed the House, 49-9, and the Senate, 27-0. Gov. Tom McCall signed it into law on June 7.

Perhaps because it had broad support, including from landowners and foresters, it didn’t merit much news coverage in the pages of The Oregonian, the state’s biggest newspaper.

But with the perspective of history, many who work in the forest sector see the event as a milestone. It was the first law of its kind in the nation. Since then, the law and its rules have been amended more than 30 times, as it was designed to change with improved understanding of forest ecosystems and effective management practices.

"I’m convinced Oregon is doing as well as any state anywhere to produce a sustainable supply of wood, while safeguarding our environment."
Tom Imeson Chair, Oregon Board of Forestry
A Day in the Woods: The Oregon Forest Practices Act

Two extension foresters explain forest protective laws in Oregon’s working forests

Video
A Day in the Woods: The Oregon Forest Practices Act

Two extension foresters explain forest protective laws in Oregon’s working forests