Does Oregon require harvested forests to be replanted?

Yes. Reforestation is a cornerstone of Oregon’s forest practice rules. Ensuring that new forests are promptly planted and successfully regrowing within a few years of harvest means future Oregonians will enjoy the same forest resources we do today – including wood products, healthy watersheds, recreational opportunities, and thriving fish and wildlife habitat. Far more trees are planted each year than are harvested.

Seedlings, seedlings and more seedlings.

Planting. Landowners must complete replanting of harvested ground within two years.

Ensuring success. Within six years of harvest, the young trees must be “free-to-grow.” That means they are vigorous and tall enough to out-compete grass and brush, and will grow into a new forest.

Trees per acre. Depending on the site, the rules require that at least 100 to 200 trees per acre survive during reforestation, but landowners typically plant about 400 seedlings per acre.

Differences in Eastern Oregon. The law also requires successful reforestation in Eastern Oregon; however, natural seeding reduces the need for intensive planting.

Tree nurseries. Nurseries, many of which are in Oregon, produce millions of healthy, high-quality seedlings, grown from seeds harvested from native tree species that match the planting area’s latitude and elevation.

A lot of planting. Oregon forest landowners plant more than 40 million seedlings every year.

"We've paid a lot of attention in growing better seedlings over the years. There's been a big change over the past few decades in how quickly we can get a vigorous new forest growing."
Mark Triebwasser Manager, Weyerhaeuser tree nursery, Aurora
A Day in the Woods: Reforestation

Two extension foresters explain reforestation laws in Oregon’s working forests

Video
A Day in the Woods: Reforestation

Two extension foresters explain reforestation laws in Oregon’s working forests